THE MODERN RAILROAD Edward Hungerford

ISBN:

Published: July 14th 2012

Kindle Edition

589 pages


Description

THE MODERN RAILROAD  by  Edward Hungerford

THE MODERN RAILROAD by Edward Hungerford
July 14th 2012 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 589 pages | ISBN: | 3.47 Mb

CHAPTER IThe Railroads and Their Beginnings 1Two great groups of railroads- East to West, and North to South—Some of the giant roads—Canals—Development of the country’s natural resources—Railroad projects—Locomotives imported—First locomotive ofMoreCHAPTER IThe Railroads and Their Beginnings 1Two great groups of railroads- East to West, and North to South—Some of the giant roads—Canals—Development of the country’s natural resources—Railroad projects—Locomotives imported—First locomotive of American manufacture—Opposition of canal-owners to railroads—Development of Pennsylvania’s anthracite mines—The merging of small lines into systems.CHAPTER IIThe Gradual Development of the Railroad 15Alarm of canal-owners at the success of railroads—The making of the Baltimore & Ohio—The “Tom Thumb” engine—Difficulties in crossing the Appalachians—Extension to Pittsburgh—Troubles of the Erie Railroad—This road the first to use the telegraph—The prairies begin to be crossed by railways—Chicago’s first railroad, the Galena & Chicago Union—Illinois Central—Rock Island, the first to span the Mississippi—Proposals to run railroads to the Pacific—The Central Pacific organized—It and the Union Pacific meet—Other Pacific roads.CHAPTER IIIThe Building of a Railroad 34Cost of a single-track road—Financing—Securing a charter—Survey-work and its dangers—Grades—Construction—Track-laying.CHAPTER IVTunnels 48Their use in reducing grades—The Hoosac Tunnel—The use of shafts—Tunnelling under water—The Detroit River tunnel.CHAPTER VBridges 56Bridges of timber, then stone, then steel—The Starucca [Pg x]Viaduct—The first iron bridge in the United States—Steel bridges—Engineering triumphs—Different types of railroad bridge—The deck span and the truss span—Suspension bridges—Cantilever bridges—Reaching the solid rock with caissons—The work of “sand-hogs”—The cantilever over the Pend Oreille River—Variety of problems in bridge-building—Points in favor of the stone bridge—Bridges over the Keys of Florida.CHAPTER VIThe Passenger Stations 80Early trains for suburbanites—Importance of the towerman—Automatic switch systems—The interlocking machine—Capacities of the largest passenger terminals—Room for locomotives, car-storage, etc.—Storing and cleaning cars—The concourse—Waiting-rooms—Baggage accommodations—Heating—Great development of passenger stations—Some notable stations in America.CHAPTER VIIThe Freight Terminals and the Yards 107Convenience of having freight stations at several points in a city—The Pennsylvania Railroad’s scheme at New York as an example—Coal handled apart from other freight—Assorting the cars—The transfer house—Charges for the use of cars not promptly returned to their home roads—The hard work of the yardmaster.CHAPTER VIIIThe Locomotives and the Cars 119Honor required in the building of a locomotive—Some of the early locomotives—Some notable locomotive-builders—Increase of the size of engines—Stephenson’s air-brake—The workshops—The various parts of the engine—Cars of the old-time—Improvements by Winans and others—Steel cars for freight.CHAPTER IXRebuilding a Railroad 138Reconstruction necessary in many cases—Old grades too heavy—Curves straightened—Tunnels avoided—These improvements required especially by freight lines.



Enter the sum





Related Archive Books



Related Books


Comments

Comments for "THE MODERN RAILROAD":


ekipacs.eu

©2008-2015 | DMCA | Contact us